Your DNA Affects

Your Fitness

Optimal fitness and bodybuilding performance depends on your genes and not just on training.

Regular training, nutrition and proper recovery helps you achieve performance in fitness, bodybuilding or competitive sports.

To achieve the best performance test your DNA and use your genetic advantage to optimize the way your workout or train. Combining these two factors will supercharge your training for faster and better results. 

The role of genes in fitness, training and competitive sports.

Everyone is unique–no training plan works the same for all athletes. The generally applicable recommendations for optimal nutrition and regeneration won’t work for everyone because your capabilities and how you use them are largely determined by your genes.

Analysis of your genes  can offer insight to help find the right exercise, workout, training or sports for you. Based on your genetic profile, our scientists design your training and nutrition guides to help you efficiently optimize your performance.

How it works

Our scientists perform a comprehensive genetic analysis of over 20 genetic variations related to individual performance. When completed, you’ll receive a detailed summarized DNA report.

The report also includes information about muscle fiber type, prevention and nutrition, and recommendations to improve personal performance.

Testing your DNA gives you insight to effectively achieve top performance in training, reduce the risk of injury and improve your health.

 

-Maximize your inborn genetic advantage-

Use DNA

To Power 

Your Workout

How much influence does DNA has on fitness and bodybuilding performance?

According to research there is a heritable component to BMI and fat mass. Several studies found that the genetic component of overweight or fat mass seems to be between 20% and 90%.

-In a family studies that compared a parent-child and sibling correlations, heritability estimates fall in the range of 20% to 80%.

-In twins studies, heritability estimates fall in the range of  50% to 90%

-In an analysis of over 3.500 twin pairs who were 4 years old, shared  environmental factors accounted for 24 percent of variance in weight adjusted for height in boys and 25 percent of the variance in girls.

Click to view some of the genes we test

More info about some of the genes we test

– FTO gene and fat sensitivity: people who take in a lot of fat and carry the unfavorable gene variation of this gene have a BMI of about 2.4 points higher than people who take in a lot of fat and have the favorable gene variant. This is a difference of approx. 18 lbs!

– PPARG gene and influence on fat sensitivity: people with the unfavorable gene variant who had a particularly high fat intake through their food, had an average of 1.9 BMI points more than persons with the favorable gene variant who had a particularly high fat intake through the food.

This is a 15 Lbs difference!

– PPARG gene Influence on weight reduction with calorie reduction and exercise: people with the favorable genetic variation lost 4.9% more weight than people with the unfavorable genetic variations.

– ADRB3 gene Influence on weight reduction through exercise: People with the unfavorable gene variant, who exercise have a 2.98-fold higher risk (298%) of becoming overweight.

– ADRB3 gene Influence on exercise and calorie reduction: People with the unfavorable gene variant lost 1.6lbs less weight than people with the favorable gene variant.

– APOA5 gene Influence on weight reduction efficiency: People with the favorable gene variant reduced their BMI by 13.4%, while people with the unfavorable gene variant reduced their BMI by 0.4% with the same effort.

– APOA2 gene and fat sensitivity: People who take in a lot of fat and have the unfavorable gene variant have on average a 6.2% higher BMI than people who take in a lot of fat and carry the favorable gene variant. This is again a variation of about 14 lbs!

 

References

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15996212

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12917707

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12406043

http://diabetes.diabetesjournals.org/content/51/8/2581.long

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14506127

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3223879/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19901143

improve bodybuilding performance with bioactify dna test

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